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About Your Skin
About Your Skin
Psoriasis Information
Eczema  Information
Baby  Information
 
I’m not sure if I have Psoriasis or Eczema?

Don't Know


Psoriasis is a condition where the skin builds up to create patches of very red, dry and flaky skin, and mostly occurs on the outside of joints, on the scalp or hair lines.

Eczema is also red and can be either wet or dry, but is very itchy; it often looks like a rash or irritation and usually appears on the inside of joints such as the elbows and knees or on the back of the hands as an adult.

 
Psoriasis

? What is Psoriasis?
Psoriasis is the abnormal build up of skin, where the body reproduces skin up to 7 times faster than usually. It appears as red, dry, flaky patches on the skin. It is common on men and women and can start at any age over 3, with peak times during early twenties and fifties. Psoriasis can be inherited but is not infectious or contagious and can break out at any age. There is no known cure for Psoriasis but it is possible to manage and even clear it for periods of time.
http://www.psorinfo.ie “Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease where there is an increase in the rate at which skin cells are produced and shed from the skin. The top layer of the skin is called the epidermis. The cells within this layer are replaced and shed all the time. This process usually takes approximately one month but in psoriasis this is much faster – less than one week. This increase results in pink thickened patches of skin with silvery white scales where the excess cells have built up on the surface of the skin.”

- Definition of psoriasis by www.psorinfo.ie

Where does it Usually Appear?
Where does it Usually Appear?

Psoriasis commonly appears on pressure points in the body such as the elbows, knees, and knuckles, as well as on the scalp and hairlines, back and torso, arms and legs, face and fingernails and toenails.

What triggers Psoriasis?
What triggers Psoriasis?

Stress can be a trigger for breakouts. Alongside the everyday stress of living with Psoriasis, there can be other causes such as work, a personal crisis or doing exams. It is a significant factor, which can lead to the first flare of psoriasis and on-going eruptions. Other triggers can be alcohol, sunburn, throat infection or medication.

10 things about Psoriasis
10 things about Psoriasis
(by www.psorinfo.ie)
  1. Psoriasis can appear anywhere on the body. However the most common sites of psoriasis are the scalp, and the outside of elbows and knees

  2. Psoriasis usually appears as red elevated plaques with silvery scales at various locations on the body

  3. Psoriasis can come and go at any time

  4. Psoriasis can occur at any age and both men and women are equally affected

  5. Psoriasis can be an inherited disorder but is not infectious or contagious

  6. Some people may develop psoriasis if other trigger factors are present such as a throat infection, sunburn, stress, medications and alcohol

  7. Sensible sun exposure can help most people but for some it can worsen Psoriasis

  8. A minority of people with Psoriasis can develop a type of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis

  9. It is possible to manage psoriasis and even to clear it

  10. Topical treatments for psoriasis are usually effective when used correctly
PSORIASIS SKIN CARE

We recognise that there are many forms of psoriasis, each of which have different needs. We have made a range of specialised herbal treatments to help relieve, repair, and soothe each of the symptoms of psoriasis.

Click here for our full range of Psoriasis Products
 
   
Eczema

?
What is Eczema?

Eczema is a recurring intensely itchy inflammation of the skin usually starting in early childhood. It is known as atopic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Eczema can show itself as redness of affected areas of skin, it is generally dry and often thickened in the areas that have been scratched. Lumps or blisters can occur in affected areas or signs of superficial infection, such as weeping or crusty deposits. Eczema can also be associated with asthma or hayfever.

Dr. John Harper
" The word eczema comes from the ancient Greek meaning 'to boil over'. It is used to describe an inflammation of the skin, which causes redness and intense itching. The most common type of eczema in children is atopic eczema, (frequently referred to as atopic dermatitis) which may be associated with asthma or hayfever."

- Definition of Eczema by Doctor John Harper MD FRCP, Consultant in Pediatric Dermatology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children

Where does it Usually Appear?
Where does it Usually Appear?

Eczema commonly appears on areas of the body such as the inside of elbows and knees, the torso, in-between the fingers and on hands, around the wrist and under the arms, under the chin and on the face.

What triggers Eczema?
What triggers Eczema?

Irritation can occur from soaps, detergents, fabrics, other chemicals and perfumed creams. People suffering from Eczema are also more prone to allergic reactions and this may make the Eczema worse. There skin is hypersensitive which can react to environmental allergies or curtains foods.

For more information go to
Common Irritants In Atopic Dermatitis: A Quick Checklist in the Tip’s and Advice
section of www.eczemaireland.org

10 Useful Tips About Eczema

 

10 Useful Tips About Eczema by www.eczemaireland.org

  1. Use cotton clothing where possible

  2. Use soap free products for bathing

  3. Use specially formulated shampoos

  4. Read the ingredients on cosmetics

  5. Use a non-bio washing powder and do not use fabric conditioner.

  6. Do not use chemical sprays and plug-ins around the home

  7. Cut down on harsh cleaning products

  8. Shower immediately after swimming in a chlorinated pool and apply a moisturiser.

  9. Sore skin and sand do not mix.  Be careful of children on holidays. A beach can be nightmare.

  10. Avoid having anybody smoke in the home, avoid houses where there are smokers.
ECZEMA SKIN CARE

When Eczema breaks out at an adult stage, it is often dry, irritated, and itchy. Help soothe the itch and irritation of Eczema with our specialised range of skincare products that use a combination of herbs, including Chickweed.

Click here for our full range of Eczema Products
 
   
Your Baby's Skin

Children's Exzema
Eczema  Information
Baby  Information
  Children’s Eczema

?

 

What is Children’s Eczema?

Eczema is the inflammation of the skin, which causes redness, dry or weepy and intense itching. The most common type of eczema in children is atopic eczema, which may be associated with asthma or hay fever. Atopic eczema is fundamentally a genetic disorder and there is often someone else in the family with eczema, asthma or hay fever, but this not always the case. A majority of children grow out of eczema when they get older.

  • Children’s Eczema can show itself as redness of affected areas of skin

  • It is generally dry and often thickened in the areas that have been scratched.

  • Lumps or blisters can occur in affected areas or signs of superficial infection, such as weeping or crusty deposits.

  • Eczema can also be associated with asthma or hay fever.

  • Especially in young children and babies, Eczema can often show itself as a wet weeping irritation
Where does it Usually Appear?

 

Where does it Usually Appear?

Eczema commonly appears on areas of the body such as the inside of elbows and knees, the torso, around the wrist and under the arms, under the chin and on the face.

What triggers Eczema?

 

What triggers Eczema?

Irritation can occur from soaps, detergents, fabrics, other chemicals and perfumed creams.

Children suffering from Eczema are also more prone to allergic reactions and this may make the Eczema worse. There skin is hypersensitive which can react to environmental allergies or curtains foods.

For more information go to
Common Irritants In Atopic Dermatitis: A Quick Checklist in the Tip’s and Advice
section of www.eczemaireland.org

 

Bathing

 

Bathing
By Doctor John Harper MD FRCP, Consultant in Pediatric Dermatology Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children

Bathing keeps the skin clean and free from crusts and scales, which helps prevent infection.

  • Bath at least once daily, twice daily is even better.

  • Bathing keeps the skin clean and free from crusts and scales, which helps prevent infection.

  • It is necessary to add a suitable bath oil to the bath water, to percent the skin from drying out.

  • Soaking in the water for 10 minutes will help the skin considerably.

  • Avoid ordinary over-the-counter soaps, which are irritant, alkaline and often perfumed.

  • The temperature of the water should be cool and the bathroom warm. Avoid any sudden changes in temperature which may make the skin itch.

  • Afterwards dry the skin by patting gently with a soft towel.

  • Bathing is better than showering, but is only a shower is possible, then use an appropriate emollient shower gel and rinse well before drying.

  • Make sure to moisturise well after a bath or shower

For more information visit the North East Valley Devision of general practice Coping with Eczema Common Questions page

Click here for our full range of Baby Skin Care Products
 
   
Cradle Cap

  Cradle cap is the yellowish, greasy scaly patches that appear on the scalp of young babies. It is a very common, harmless condition that does not usually itch or cause any discomfort to the baby.

Cradle cap usually begins in babies during their first three months and tends to last a few weeks or months. It usually clears up by the time the child is two years old, although in rare cases children can have cradle cap for a lot longer. The cause of cradle cap is not clear, although it may be linked to overactive sebaceous glands, which are glands in the skin that produce an oily substance called sebum.

Click here for our full range of Baby Skin Care Products
 
   
Nappy Rash

  Nappy Rash causes your baby's skin to become sore and irritated in the area around the nappy, and covered in pink or red spots or blotches, it is usually caused by your baby's skin coming into contact with urine and faeces in their nappy.

Nappy rash usually develops when your baby is between 9 and 12 months old. Most nappy rashes are mild and can be treated with a simple skin care routine. Your baby will not usually feel pain or discomfort.

Click here for our full range of Baby Skin Care Products
 
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